Modules of an app
Strategy

How to Get Familiar With A New Codebase


As a developer, let’s assume you just got a new job and you are finding it hard to settle in and start working on your new team’s codebase. In this article, we discuss some of the tricks that can help you familiarize with a new codebase faster.

These tips and tricks are a summary after intense research and consulting with some field developers in the industry. They are also inspired by my new job at Instamobile. There’s no magic here, just practical and efficient steps in getting you familiar with a new codebase as fast as possible.

This article will as well help you as a developer to maintain a sane codebase for the next developer that will take on your good work. Let’s jump right in

Run the App as An End-User

You should run the live app and look out for app functions, you should scan through the app looking out for possible modules that the code could be divided into. Such modules could be onboarding, chat, home module and so on.

For the frontend devs, you want to be looking out for menus, bottom navigation, drawers, or any widgets that hold the whole app into one piece.

Some of the time, you will be working on one module at a time so your focus should be on that one module and you could mentally break it down into submodules.

Modules of an app

Looking at the image above I can immediately identify some of the major modules of the entire application and I know what modules of the app to look out for when I dive into the codebase and start working on improvements.

Dive Into the Documentation

Now that you’re done disintegrating the app mentally into separate modules, you want to dive into the code and look out for any form of documentation that exists prior. I personally categorize documentation into low-level documentation and high-level documentation.

High-level documentation would refer to the requirement documentation, architecture design and technical documentation.

For the low-level documentation, you should look out for some naming conventions, comments, and folder arrangement.

A folder arrangement

The above image displays a typical self-documented folder arrangement and already tells me where to find code for the screens, the state managers, navigation, major app components and even the general app styles.

Study the Code and Ask Questions

The goal here is not to bug down your current team with questions. You have to do a lot of study on the codebase yourself given that there’s a lot of information on the codebase and system you’ll be working on.

The importance of study cannot be overemphasized. A little amount of study can yield to tremendous benefits and help you take initiative on new project ideas, refactoring, improvements on the codebase.

It is advised to only ask questions of crucial relevance in order not to come off as a pain in the ass to your new colleagues/team. I have a colleague that insists that no question is too stupid in programming and I totally agree with him on this.

It is a great quality of a developer not only to ask questions but to ask the questions right that means framing the question in such a way that you get a helpful answer.

Rewrite

In extreme conditions, you might want to rewrite some or all of the codebase that you would be working on. This should be in cases where the codebase is going to cause extra problems for both you and devs that will work on the same codebase in the future.

This could cost your new company a lot of time and effort to achieve and this should be the last resort. Trust me you should discuss real long with your supervisor on the pros and cons of rewriting some or all of the modules of the codebase you’re in charge of.

Conclusion

These tricks can be applied one module at a time and then use the tricks acquired and apply to other modules of the codebase.

It is also of extreme importance for you as a developer to maintain a close to pristine codebase as you can so as not to make another developers’s life a nightmare.

Getting started on a new codebase can be very tricky and difficult for anyone settling into a new team and learning a new codebase but I hope this article helps you make it enjoyable venture trying to familiarize yourself with a new codebase.



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Strategy

Color pallet selection rationale [SpaceX] : webdev


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(From the Dragon Crew Demo 2 mission)

I have seen a lot of these high stake operations(mostly in movies) using software screens which have such blue backgrounds with a peculiar font type – like hackers in movies breaking into a government facility, screens in NASA, SpaceX, and such.

Is there a scientific/logical reason behind this? If yes, can having such screens for UI make something like an inventory management system or an ERP system more productive/efficient?

I am looking for resources that gives you the reason and the background to make such futuristic UIs, if I may call it so.



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Strategy

[Showoff Saturday] Bingo with a Twist


Made a fun project for public bingo games with a twist. Bingo games are based on upcoming events and instead of numbers, use predictions on what will happen during the event. For example, the PS5 reveal event is coming up and you can mark down your predictions and see if you can fill your board. Right now I have the games set up as only the user that makes the event (owner/moderator) can add values that players can choose from. I’m thinking of changing that to just have the players that join the bingo event the ability to fill in their own board. As the title says this is very alpha build. Do you have any feedback for me? Let me know if there is anything I should change to this, or if this is a project I should continue pursuing. The site is PartyDingo.com

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Strategy

Font style vs typeface/font : graphic_design


Hi everyone. I’ve been tasked with creating a presentation and was provided with a style guide to use when making color and font choices. Below is a sample of the “font style” I am provided. I am confused as to the difference between font, font style and typeface. Am I free to use any typeface so long as Headings are bolded and body text is ‘regular’? Thanks in advance!

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Strategy

Align text with CSS object : web_design


Hi guys, I would like to go from de first picture to the second :

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Here is the code :

.espace-nouvelles{
position: absolute;
width: 1200px;
height: 500px;
background-color: lightblue;
margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;
margin-top: 30px;
left: 0;
right: 0;
border-radius: 10px;
z-index: 1; }

.backgroundt{
position: fixed;
width: 1200px;
height: 100%;
background:white ;
left: 0;
right: 0;
margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;
z-index: 0;
border-radius: 10px;
}

.style-article{
position: relative;
z-index: 1;
text-align: justify
}

Finally, I want the text to be aligned at the left of the blue background (in it).

Thank you very much

Reset60



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Strategy

Technical lettering in the 1970s : graphic_design


Writing has always been influenced by the tools we use. It can be a broad nib pen, a brush or a typewriter. It’s fascinating to look closer at how these devices work, and what in their construction, or in the way we use them, influences the form of the letters.

I’ve started to collect some textual and visual notes on tools and processes that informed my work as typeface designer. Here is the first design bite: a 5’ read on the Tecnostyl Lettering Set from the 1970s.

https://medium.com/@cinetype/technical-lettering-in-the-1970s-19afaf138805

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pSvitlana Serhiivna Reshetchenko at the 319km crossing on the PoltavaKyivskaSuprunivka distance of the Southern Railways.p
Strategy

The Women of Ukraine’s Railroads Keep the Trains Running


During long train rides across Ukraine as a kid in the 1990s, Sasha Maslov amused himself by leaning out the window, as far as possible, to glimpse what lay ahead. What intrigued him most were the tiny pastel-colored houses with pointed tile roofs and elaborate ironwork that sat near railroad crossings.

“I would wonder about them as I fell asleep,” Maslov says. “They seemed like tiny castles, headquarters for something magical.”

In fact, the buildings are railroad crossing offices presided over by traffic controllers, the vast majority of them women. As trains approach, they hold up safety flags alerting conductors to conditions on the track while also keeping an eye on drivers and pedestrians. Anachronistic as it sounds, they’ve proven indispensable, even in the age of automation.

“When the railroad company tried to take them away, traffic accident statistics shot up, because people were trying to go around barriers and not heeding directions,” Maslov says. “Because if no one is watching, why not break the rules?”

Svitlana Serhiivna Reshetchenko at the 319-km crossing on the Poltava-Kyivska-Suprunivka distance of the Southern Railways.

Photograph: Sasha Maslov

Eleven years ago, Maslov moved to New York City, where he shoots for clients like NBC, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2018, weary of the news cycle (“the war in Ukraine, Syria, the migrant crisis, Trump,” he says), he decided to return home to photograph these whimsical structures and their guardians for his new book Ukrainain Railroad Ladies.

After receiving permission from state-owned Ukrainian Railways, he called up each of its six regional offices and arranged shoots at 100 crossing buildings. His subjects primped for picture day, greeting him in impeccable gold-embroidered uniforms—though he did catch a few unawares, like the officer who flagged down a bicyclist she knew to retrieve her makeup from home.

Tetyana Grygorivna Dobronozhenko stands inside the Smila Station at the 208-km crossing of Odessa Railways.

Photograph: Sasha Maslov

The stations were as charming inside as out, often decorated with personal touches like floral wallpaper and lace curtains, and personalized with family photographs, crocheted pillows, and houseplants. But if they felt homey, it’s partly because the women spent so much time in them. They worked 12-hour shifts every couple days for a pay of $300 per month.

“The allure will wear out on you very quickly if you’re actually working there,” Maslov says. “Though from a visual perspective, I still find it magical.”

Ukrainian Railroad Ladies is out this month from Osnovy Publishing.


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crescent view of Jupiter
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Space Photos of the Week: An Eternal Voyage of Discovery


In 1977, two spacecraft launched to the edges of the solar system. Their mission was to explore the outer planets and send information to the team back on Earth. Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 each had different trajectories planned, which meant they would each see different things along their journeys. Voyager 1’s mission was to fly by Jupiter and Saturn. While there, it discovered new moons, even ones covered in volcanoes (we see you Io). Voyager 2 had a bit more to do; not only would it also visit Jupiter and Saturn, it would become the first spacecraft to fly by Uranus and Neptune. In 2012 Voyager 1 left the heliopause—the region of space where the wind from our sun stops having influence on the environment, aka the entry into interstellar space. And recently, like all siblings trying to keep up, Voyager 2 left it too.

Currently both spacecraft are headed in different directions in relation to our sun. If you think of the plane of our solar system as a flat piece of paper, Voyager 1 headed slightly north while Voyager 2 headed south. Part of the reason for this decision was trying to understand the shape of our solar system and to understand exactly where the heliopause might be in either direction. After traveling for over 40 years, Voyager 1 is now almost 14 billion miles from Earth, while Voyager 2 is nearly 12 billion miles from Earth. They are headed in the direction of other star systems, but even traveling at nearly 40,000 miles per hour, it will take Voyager 1 more than 200,000 years to reach the nearest star. Believe it or not, both spacecraft phone into Earth almost every day to send back data from the depths of deep space. In honor of these intrepid explorers, we are going to travel along with both missions this week to gaze upon the outer planets, and then take a look back at Earth as well.

Grab your space suit, we’re headed out to the farthest reaches of our solar system.

On March 24, 1979, Voyager 1 took this photo of Jupiter. Voyager 1’s encounter with Jupiter began in early March and ended in early April, and during that time took a total of 19,000 images and other scientific measurements. Just a few weeks after Voyager 1 departed for Saturn, Voyager 2 showed up to finish the job. One of the most surprising discoveries from the Jupiter encounters were the active volcanoes on the small moon Io. It was and still is the only planetary body apart from Earth with known active volcanoes.Photograph: NASA/JPL
After traveling about 400 million miles, Voyager 2 arrived at Saturn, where it snapped this seemingly sideways photo of the ringed beauty. While the Voyagers were near Saturn they discovered that the winds around the equator move very fast—up to 1,100 miles an hour.Photograph: NASA/JPL
Next stop on the tour takes us much farther out to Uranus. While we can’t see them in this image, Uranus also has a thin band of rings. When Voyager 2 visited the planet in 1986, it discovered 10 new moons, which all got named after characters in Shakespeare plays. Not only did Voyager 2 detect winds of 450 miles per hour in Uranus’ upper atmosphere, it also found evidence of a boiling ocean of water nearly 500 miles below the upper clouds.Photograph: NASA/JPL-Caltech
The final destination on this grand tour is Neptune. On August 25, 1989, Voyager 2 flew over the cloud tops of the planet after traveling nearly 4.3 billion miles to get there. During the encounter it discovered six new moons and found a few oval shaped storms. The spacecraft also found that there was an abundance of hydrogen in the atmosphere, though methane is what gives Neptune its blue appearance.Photograph: NASA/JPL
After Voyager 2 flew past Neptune, NASA officially changed the mission name to the Voyager Interstellar Mission. Both spacecraft were on a trajectory to depart the solar system, but before turning off the cameras, Voyager 1 was commanded to turn and face the Earth. On February 14, 1990, from a distance of 3.7 billion miles, Voyager 1 took this photo now known as the Pale Blue Dot. That’s us, suspended in a sunbeam.Photograph: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Head over here to look at more space photos.


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Increment Issue 13: Frontend | CSS-Tricks
Strategy

Increment Issue 13: Frontend | CSS-Tricks


Increment is a beautiful quarterly magazine (print and web) published by Stripe “about how teams build and operate software systems at scale”. While there is always stuff about making websites in general, this issue is the first focused on front-end¹ development.

I’ve got an article in there: When frontend means full stack. I’ll probably someday port it over here and perhaps add some more context (there were some constraints for print) but I love how it turned out on their site! A taste:

We handle this growing responsibility in different ways. Even though we all technically fall within the same big-tent title, many frontend developers wind up specializing. Often, we don’t have a choice. The term “unicorn” once described the extremely rare person who was good at both frontend and backend development, but these days it’s just as rare to find people skilled at the full spectrum of frontend development. In fact, the term “full stack” has largely come to mean “a frontend developer who does a good amount of the stuff a backend developer used to do.”

The whole issue is chock full of wonderful authors:

And the article that is the most right up my alley, Why is CSS . . . the way it is? by Chris Lilley. It’s somehow astonishing, gutwrenching, understandable, and comfortable to know that CSS evolves like any other software project. Sometimes thoughtfully and carefully, and sometimes with a meh, we’ll fix it later.

Once a feature is in place, it’s easier to slightly improve it than to add a new, better, but completely different feature that does the same thing.

This explains, for example, why list markers were initially specified in CSS by expanding the role of float. (The list marker was floated left so the list item text wrapped around it to the right.) That effort was abandoned and replaced by the list-style-position property, whose definition currently has the following, not very confidence-inspiring inline issue: “This is handwavey nonsense from CSS2, and needs a real definition.”

That’s a damn fine collection of writings on front end if you ask me.

A big thank you to Sid Orlando and Molly McArdle who helped me through the process and seem to do a great job running the ship over there.



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How do I get this cloned chat app to build properly? : webde…


I want to learn how to build a chat app on angular but every tutorial is outdated with code that doesn’t work anymore. So I googled “angular chat app” released recently and got this:

https://github.com/djjorik/angular-chat

I cloned it, started MongoDB, ran the script of ` npm run start:dev && start-front-dev` but nothing comes in localhost:4200.

Only backend experience i have is with Spring so I have no clue what this terminal is saying to me:

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Did the app successfully launch? Cause localhost:4200 doesn’t work. I am not interested in the Nest.js part, only in the Angular part so I could get a grip on how to build a chat app myself, only powered by Spring.



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