How do you replicate this distortion effect?
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How do you replicate this distortion effect?


How do you replicate this distortion effect?

Hi, I was wondering how I can reproduce the same style of the text as the picture below. Seems like some kind of distortion.

https://preview.redd.it/jibj15w9vzq41.jpg?width=1342&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=123a45ce57907405e3338d96c9f3071230bf5c21

Thanks for the help

submitted by /u/MrSimTweety
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Marquee_featured
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CSS-Only Marquee Effect | Codrops


Marquee_featured

Some time ago I encountered this great Dribbble shot by Francesco Zagami. It has a really nice marquee animation when hovering a menu item (you have to wait a couple of seconds to see the menu).

I really love this effect and I have seen it in more designs recently. So I wanted to try and implement it using CSS only, without any JavaScript, and share it with you. After some searching, I found an interesting solution on StackOverflow by Fabrizio Calderan and one by Alvin Kobie on Codepen.

In the meantime, Fabrizio showed another really brilliant solution that does not require the repeated spans, but that uses text shadows. Have a look at it here: https://codepen.io/fcalderan/pen/GRJeYOL

For this demo, I needed to adjust the styles a bit to create the exact effect seen in Francesco’s Dribbble shot, like offsetting the marquee text and fading it in on hover. The marquee requires text repetition so that the illusion works. The main idea is to animate the marquee infinitely, restarting it seamlessly.

For that we can use the following markup:

<div class="marquee">
	<div class="marquee__inner" aria-hidden="true">
		<span>Showreel</span>
		<span>Showreel</span>
		<span>Showreel</span>
		<span>Showreel</span>
	</div>
</div>

… and these styles:

.marquee {
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
    --offset: 20vw;
    --move-initial: calc(-25% + var(--offset));
    --move-final: calc(-50% + var(--offset));
}

.marquee__inner {
    width: fit-content;
    display: flex;
    position: relative;
    transform: translate3d(var(--move-initial), 0, 0);
    animation: marquee 5s linear infinite;
    animation-play-state: paused;
}

.marquee span {
    font-size: 10vw;
    padding: 0 2vw;
}

.marquee:hover .marquee__inner {
    animation-play-state: running;
}

@keyframes marquee {
    0% {
        transform: translate3d(var(--move-initial), 0, 0);
    }

    100% {
        transform: translate3d(var(--move-final), 0, 0);
    }
}

For the marquee to have an offset (i.e. we want to show the first item, cut off at the beginning), it basically needs to be pulled back. So let’s use four repeated items, like this:

The amount that we want the items to be pulled back is defined in the variable --move-initial. So -25% makes it move back the exact length of one item (as we have four in total).

And the --offset lets us adjust this a bit, so that we see some of the text. --move-final is the end position of the animation, where we can seamlessly start a new loop. It’s half of the way (two items now), again with one item on the left being cut off the same amount like in the initial position. By setting an adequate font size (in vw), we can make sure that three repetitions are visible in the viewport. This is important for the “illusion” to work (i.e. start the next loop).

For the demo, I’ve added some more transitions and images with a blend mode. Have a look at the code if you’d like to see how that all works together.

I really hope you like this demo and find it useful!

Credits

Inspirational Websites Roundup #14





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How a Barbie Polaroid Camera Is Helping Me Shelter in Place
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How a Barbie Polaroid Camera Is Helping Me Shelter in Place


Remember 1999? SpongeBob SquarePants premiered for the first time. President Bill Clinton was impeached and acquitted. And, of course, Polaroid released its iconic Barbie camera! It was truly a time to be alive. Sure, there was Y2K, but I was 5 years old and blissfully unaware of all the drama.

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic madness this past month, when I was scared and beginning to shelter in place, I saw an ad for a limited-edition retro Barbie Polaroid camera, inspired by the original model from ‘99. Hours later, my sisters pinged me with a link to it too. Our Barbie-filled childhoods were calling.

I needed something to lift my spirits, and that just so happened to come in bright pink, green, and purple packaging.

Barbie World

Barbie—who recently turned 61 and was on a 60th anniversary Totally Throwback Tour until the pandemic put it on pause—was a huge part of my late ‘90s, early ‘00s adolescence. As the youngest of four children, and about half a decade behind my siblings (who were all close in age), I spent a lot of time playing by myself. They never intentionally left me out, but they had lots of cool older-kid things to do. When I was alone, I relied on that box of Barbies. We had classic Barbies, Spice Girl Barbies—even a Beach Barbie that sat on a shelf in its original box. And we had a wonderful time together. I brushed (and poorly cut) their hair, put on fashion shows, took them swimming in the tub, and lost every tiny damn shoe they ever wore.

My love for Polaroid cameras (and all photography) came in adulthood after I found a 1977 Polaroid One Step Land Camera in an antique store. It reminded me just how fun their loud shutter noise was and the surprising gratification you get when that big square photo prints out and slowly develops before your eyes. It inspired me to begin collecting other old film cameras.

More Than Just Nostalgia

Photograph: Medea Giordano

The new Polaroid 600 Barbie Throwback camera ($149) doesn’t just look like an old Polaroid. It kinda is one. The camera’s internals are made from original Polaroid electronics that have been refurbished and tested by Retrospekt, a vintage-product restoration company, housed in a new plastic exterior that is just slightly updated from the ‘99 version. No batteries are needed, as they’re built into each film pack. (It takes an eight-pack of 600 film in color or black and white.) Unlike some of the other instant cameras released today, it produces the full-size photos you’ll remember from yesteryear.





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Self-Taught Dev here! Feedback on my resume and portfolio wo…


I’m a self-taught developer of 1 and a half years, I’m going to start applying but I need some feedback on what I should improve or build next. I’m also planning on making my 2nd project the portfolio that holds my other projects. Thanks in advance!

Project 1 built from scratch (HTML, CSS, Sass, JS, jQuery): https://pcastrophotography.netlify.com

Project 2 which is going to be my portfolio site (React, Gatsby): https://pcastroportfolio.netlify.com

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