Things You May Not Have Considered With No-Code
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Things You May Not Have Considered With No-Code


What Is No-Code Anyway?

“I think that we need to define what no-code is. I also think that we need to define what programming is. My definition of programming, in this context, would be the organization of logic and data to accomplish an objective.

I really like what Steve Losh had to say on the subject of programmers: Programmers shape ideas into text.

That text gets turned into numbers and those numbers bump into other numbers and make things happen.
As programmers, we use text editors to get our ideas out of our heads and create the chunks of text we call “programs.” Full-time programmers will spend tens of thousands of hours of their lives interacting with their text editor, during which they’ll be doing many things:

  • Getting raw text from their brains into their computers
  • Correcting mistakes in that text
  • Restructuring the text to formulate a problem in a different way
  • Documenting how and why something was done a particular way
  • Communicating with other programmers about all of these things

I’m a computer engineer. In school, we built a computer. Lots of bread boards, wires, and components. The way to see things work through the computer was through dip switches. 

So this was how to code op-codes into the computer registers and then manually clock the instruction through the cpu pipeline. So this was programming with machine code. The point of the class was to show and understand the very basics of how a computer works.

The next class was on assembly language. Here was a language that would compile into machine code. It allowed you to do some very basic things like load registers and basic loops with goto statements. You could create functions and modularize pieces of code that could be called over and over again. So, was assembly language no-code when compared to machine code?

The next class was the C programming language. It is considered a mid-level language because you can do assembly code directly in functions and call those functions from other C functions. So the compiler would convert your C code into assembly, and the assembler would compile the assembly code into machine code. When compared with assembly language, was the C programming language no-code?

The next class was the C++ programming language. This is considered a high-level programming language, even though you can mix C and C++ code in the same project. C++ introduced object-oriented constructs into the language. Now you could conceptualize your logic and data into objects. The new thing here wasn’t anything to do with programming, per se, but with a new way to solve programming problems with objects. Is C++ no-code when compared to the C programming language?

Hot on the trails of C++ came Java. Java was object-oriented but introduced the concept of a virtual machine. Write once, run anywhere. Now your Java code is compiled into byte code, which is then run through an assembler that executes the byte code on the native computer. You got things like Just In Time Compiler (JIT Compiler). This introduced run-time optimization that the JIT compiler would do in detecting Hot Spots in the code and optimizing that byte code/assembly code. In certain circumstances, you could get Java code to run faster than C++ code. Same question, is Java considered no-code when compared to C++?

I could do the same analysis on C#, which is just Microsoft’s version of Java. Also, all interpreted languages, like Bash, Perl, Python, and Javascript. What about functional programming languages that offer constructs like map, reduce, and filter? Programmers who learn functional programming, after programming in imperative languages, regularly report using far less code to solve the same problems. Does this make functional programming no-code when compared to imperative languages?

When I see Lego Mind Storms programming with visual components, where the code flows graphically from left to right, this was considered no-code programming. It was very frustrating to work with and even harder to modularize and debug. I think that no-code is just a way to try and introduce basic programming concepts, like solving a problem by organizing data and logic. There are always going to be problems that can be solved most efficiently using a specific language. 

Different professionals are going to turn their preferred language and approach into a cult-like following and only see how to solve problems using that language and/or approach. When it comes to no-code, the people touting it are interested in getting people to understand the very basics of how to approach a problem by organizing logic and data to work together and solve that problem. Once those concepts are understood, the no-code language gets in the way of doing other things that are programming like:

  1. Using a debugger
  2. Version control
  3. Effective documentation
  4. Etc.

If there is a language that is created, that is easier for laypeople to organize logic and data to solve a problem, that isn’t going to be called no-code, it will be called a programming language.”

 Frank Eaves, Senior Engineer at DZone

No-Code Isn’t Just a Fad

“Just like with any field, fads come and go and new technologies sometimes gain hype that outpaces their usefulness in practice. In many cases, it is beneficial to heed the advice of Fred Brooks, who stated that rarely does there come a technology that reduces the development time of software by any order of magnitude. In the case of no-code, there is a tendency to treat this advancement as a solution to every problem, but despite this exaggerated view, there are numerous benefits that no-code can bring to both developers and non-developers.

No-code ensures that repeated solutions, such as querying a database or even best-practices when designing a user interface, can be generated without human intervention. This enables developers to focus on the tasks that require their expert attention and aids in removing the bugs that are so common when implementing standard solutions to recurring problems. For non-developers, no-code allows laymen to create rich applications without having to spend the months and years necessary to understand a programming language (or multiple languages). Thus, no-code tools can allow business professionals, and even children, to create advanced applications without the overhead of rigorous study.

While no-code tends to be over-hyped as a solution that will eventually eliminate programmers and manually-written code altogether, there are some major benefits to this approach when paired and intermingled with current software development practices. No-code should not be viewed as the savior-practice that will end programming, but it also should not be overlooked as a passing fad.”

 — Justin Albano (@justinmalbano), Software Engineer at Catalogic Software

No-Code Is the Destiny of Software Development

“There might not exist silver bullets according to Fred Brooks, but in our line of business, even silver dust is worth its weight in gold. Maybe the computer will never be able to completely replace the software developer through concepts such as no-code, but even an incremental improvement of 10-20 percent might result in that you get your product out before your competitor while saving millions of dollars in the process.

These ideas are really nothing new. Creating higher abstractions is an exercise software developers have participated in for decades. Most software developers today don’t even know how to manually handle memory today due to garbage collectors. And few developers are manually creating their own socket libraries. No-code is simply the natural progression of this. No-code is the point in time in this process where we have accumulated so many reusable libraries and tools that it becomes possible to create interfaces for orchestrating these pre-built building blocks together using things such as natural language, high-level architectural sketches, and humanly understandable natural language-based specifications.

I once created a proof of concept where I was able to use natural language to create my UI by saying stuff such as “Create widget,” and my computer would ask “What widget?” and present me with options. Currently, I am working on Magic — which is probably slightly more useful — where I can instantly create all CRUD operations towards any database by simply clicking a button. Does it replace the software developer? No! Does it simplify the job? Of course it does, just like your garbage collector, socket library, and all other tools does. When we started creating cars 100 years ago, imagining factories without human beings was impossible. Software development is still in its infancy today, kind of like car manufacturing was in the 1930s. 

Do me a favor, please; walk into a car factory and try to find a human being. Sure, they’re still there, hidden somewhere between thousands of robots and machines, but not even closely resembling the way they (humans) used to be present 100 years ago. Then come back and tell me, “I still don’t believe in no-code.” The fact is, no-code is the destiny of software development. It’s simply a matter of measuring speed and incremental improvements. 10 years ago it took a single developer 3 months to create a simple SPA, today it’s a scaffolding button in many frameworks. At some point in time, possibly already some will argue, the speed of application development will simply have grown so rapidly that for all practical concerns, we will refer to it as “true no-code.”

In the meantime, you can make a conscious decision and tell yourself the following; “Yes, I want to save 20% of my software development budget! Yes, I want to deliver 25% faster than my competitors!” Once you do, and you start looking for things that can deliver upon your request, you will find dozens, if not hundreds, of libraries, tools, and frameworks that allow you to easily deliver according to your wishes. “Silver Dust is real!”





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Password strength low
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Implement a Password Strength Meter in Angular 8


Introduction

In most applications, there is a field while registering to enter a valid password, which should contain at least a number and one special symbol. In this article, we are going to learn how to create a password strength bar that will detail the strength of a given password.

Prerequisite

  • Basic knowledge of Angular.
  • Visual Studio Code must be installed.
  • Angular CLI must be installed.
  • Node must be installed.

Step 1

Let’s create a new Angular project, using the following npm command.

 

Step 2

Now, let’s create a new component by using the following command.

 

Step 3

Now, open the password-strength-bar.component.html file and add the following code in this file.

 

Step 4

Now, open the password-strength-bar.component.ts file and add the following code in this file. 

 

Step 5

Now, open the password-strength-bar.component.css file and add the following code in this file. 

 

Step 6

Now, open the app.component.html file and add the following code. 

  

Step 7

Now, open the app.component.ts file and add the following code in this file.

 

Step 8

Now, open the app.module.ts file and add the following code in this file.

Step 9

Now, let’s run the project by using  npm start or ng serve command and check the output:

Password strength low

Password strength low

Password strength medium

Password strength medium

Password strength fair

Password strength fair

Password strength good

Password strength good

Password strength great

Password strength great

Summary

In this article, We have learned how we can create a password strength bar in Angular 8 applications.

Please give your valuable feedback/comments/questions about this article. Please let me know if you liked and understood this article, and how I could improve upon it.



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typespecimens.io
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typespecimens.io


If you’re looking for a new typeface for that side project of yours then here’s a great website by John D. Jameson that collects a bunch of the latest type specimen websites. Everything is on display here, from the daring and bold, to those that are a bit more professional and reserved.

Not only are there a ton of great typefaces on display and for sale, but the websites for these specimens are fantastic, too. My favorite at the moment has to this website by Grilli Type for GT America: Bright colors! Lovely illustrations! Fancy animations that aren’t annoying!

It’s a wonderful example of what’s possible with just a few colors and one big, beautiful typeface:

On that note, make sure to check out the full catalogue of fonts by Grilli Type because yikes is there a lot in there to love.

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2020 Emoji Designs
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2020 Emoji Designs


2020 Emoji Designs

So, I decided that the current standard Emoji set wasn't really appropriate any more. In light of this, i decided it needed a 2020 update.

https://preview.redd.it/qs8o62rstgq41.jpg?width=7622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=2b882a2ae45f08ffab52be16572e29e9601f9645

submitted by /u/Legacy40k
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Rethinking Code Comments
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Rethinking Code Comments


Justin Duke asks if treating code comments like footnotes could help us understand the code in a file better. In his mockup, all the comments are hidden by default and require a click to reveal:

What a neat idea! Justin’s design reminds me of the way that Instapaper treated inline footnotes.

Instapaper (circa 2012)

I guess the reason I like this idea so much is that a lot of comments don’t need to be read constantly, — they’re sort of a reminder that, “Hey, this needs work in the future” or “Yikes, this is weird and I’m sorry.” Keeping these comments out of the code makes it much easier to scan the whole file, too.

I do wonder if there could be a toggle that shows every comment, just in case you need to read all the comments in sequence rather than clicking to toggle each one.

Anyway, all this talk about comments reminds me of an absolutely fantastic talk by Sarah Drasner at JSConf this year where she discussed why comments are so dang hard to get right:

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Downloading Node
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Add Reactstrap Components In ReactJS


Introduction 

Reactstrap is a component library for React. It provides inbuilt Bootstrap components that make it easy to create UI with self-contained components that provide flexibility and inbuilt validations. Reactstrap is easy to use and supports Bootstrap 4.

Prerequisites

  • We should have a basic knowledge of HTML and JavaScript.
  • Visual Studio Code should be installed.
  • Node and NPM installed.

First of all, let’s check that Node is installed in your system. If not, check out this link: https://nodejs.org/en/download/ 

Downloading Node

Downloading Node

Download the latest version of Node.js according to the Windows version (64-bit or 32-bit) on your machine. To check the configuration of your machine, right-click on “My Computer”, select Properties, and check the system type. After downloading Node.js, install it. 

Let’s create a new react project by using the following command,

Install Bootstrap

Reactstrap does not include Bootstrap CSS, so to use Bootstrap CSS, we need to add Bootstrap. Use the following command to install two application configuration settings defined — one that stores the name of the MongoDB database and the other that contains the MongoDB connection string (with a placeholder for the database name). You should have something like:

Install Reactstrap by using the following command:

Now open the index.js file and import Bootstrap CSS. 

Now, right-click on src folder and add a new component, named ReactstrapDemo.js.

Now, open ReactstrapDemo.js component and import the required reference. Let’s import the required Reactstrap components:

Add the following code in this component:

Now, open the app.js file and add the following code:

Now, run the project and check the result:

Initial ouput

Initial ouput

Now, add a new component named ReactstrapDemo1.js. Now, open the ReactstrapDemo1.js component:

Now, open the app.js file and add the following code:

Now run the project and check the result

Collapsed panel with Reactstrap

Collapsed panel with Reactstrap

Uncollapsed panel with Reactstrap

Uncollapsed panel with Reactstrap



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Post image
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I’ve build a better mockup finding website : graphic_design


Hey designers! I’m a digital design student. I’ve made better, cleaner, prettier mockup finding experience. Every mockup is handpicked by me and my fellow design students. No ads, no timed redirects, no bullshit. It’s called Malli, (which means model or design).

https://malli.graphics

I’ve processed all feedback I got last time.

I’d love any feedback you guys can give me to make it even better.

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Post image
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[Flask + Folium] How do I create polygons on a map that open…


Hello.

I’m doing a personal project where I need to add clickable polygons on a map, which, when clicked, it opens up a side screen, like in the picture below. I’m trying to replicate bing’s covid webpage just to try and learn some webdev during quarantine. The idea is that a side-screen with covid data for a specific city would appear when the polygon containing said city is clicked.

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What I want

I’m a beginner on webdev, but I do have some experience with python (data scientist here). That’s why I chose to start my first project with flask. In order to work with maps on flask, I’m using a lib called folium, which makes it very easy. I can make popup appears when I click on the polygon, but these are not enough, because it messes up the visualization of the map (below).

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What I have

I know nothing about React or vue.js but I’m willing to learn. I just need some guidance, because I’m stuck :/

Thank you very much!



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Web Performance Checklist | CSS-Tricks
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Web Performance Checklist | CSS-Tricks


The other day, I realized that web performance is an enormous topic covering so very much — from minimizing assets to using certain file formats, it can be an awful lot to keep in mind while building a website. It’s certainly far too much for me to remember!

So I made a web performance checklist. It’s a Notion doc that I can fork and use to mark completed items whenever I start a new project. It also contains a bunch of links for references.

This doc is still a work in progress. Any recommendations or links?Feel free to suggest something in the comments below!



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